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What happens when you lose your nursing license?

On Behalf of | Oct 26, 2020 | Professional License Issues |

Recently, you lost your nursing license. While you may face several disciplinary actions, your biggest concern is navigating the loss of your license.

American Mobile explores what happens after a license suspension. Learn how to plan your next moves and bounce back as well as you can.

Contact the Board of Nursing

One of the first things you should do is contact Pennsylvania’s Board of Nursing to see whether you face permanent license revocation. If you do not, inquire about your reinstatement conditions and terms. You must complete all of the board’s requirements before reinstating your license. For instance, if you lost your license because of alcohol or drug abuse, you may have to complete a treatment program before earning your license back. You may also have to complete a waiting period before getting your license back, such as a year from the date of your revocation issuance.

Secure alternate employment

While working to reinstate your license, you still need a source of income. Even though you do not have a nursing license, you may still qualify for jobs in the medical industry that do not require a license. For example, you could work as a home health aide, medical assistant or nursing assistant. Research the employment environments and standard job duties to determine which position could be an ideal fit for you. If you have computer skills, they could qualify you for work as a medical transcriptionist or medical secretary.

Most of the positions mentioned require a background check, so expect employers to learn of your license revocation. A history of neglecting or abusing patients may disqualify you for several positions.

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