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How can communication help prevent problems for a doctor?

| Dec 4, 2020 | Professional License Issues |

One of the biggest reasons for medical mistakes is communication errors. Many malpractice situations arise because a doctor does not clearly communicate with a patient, leaving the patient unable to make educated decisions about his or her care.

It only stands to reason that if you improve your ability to communicate with patients and with staff, you can help avoid serious issues that could put your medical license at risk.

Common issues

According to the National Institutes of Health, patients are likely to feel ill at ease with the communication between you and them if you are not honest and open about their care. If you do not take time to ensure they understand what you are telling them or you do not seem to value them as a person, then these things also can upset a patient and lead to dissatisfaction with the care you provide.

Good solutions

To ensure good communication, you should focus on the patient. Read the verbal and non-verbal clues properly. Try to treat them as you would want someone to treat you in the same situation. Be direct and clear when explaining things.

You also need to listen. Pay attention when your patients speak, and let them know you are hearing what they are saying. Also, manage expectations carefully. Do not make promises just to make a patient feel better. Keep things real and honest.

Make sure to start off every meeting in a good way. Develop a relationship with your patients. Do not treat them like they are not intelligent enough to be a part of their care. Take time to explain what you want to do and why you want to do it. Give them enough information to make an informed decision or to give you informed consent.

 

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