You worked hard to get the specialized education for your field, and you continued to learn and grow during your career. It was also difficult to obtain and keep the licensing required for nurses in Pennsylvania. Unfortunately, it can be easy to lose your license, as you may be aware. Whether you have lost your nursing license or you are worried that it may soon be revoked, you may be concerned about your future employment prospects. 

There are many ways a medical professional can lose his or her license. Substance addiction – to alcohol, prescription medications or illicit substances – is one of the most common threats to a nurse’s license. The job is demanding and stressful, and many nurses deal with their anxiety by turning to addictive substances. A nurse can also lose his or her license by abusing or neglecting patients, making a serious mistake that harmed a patient or falsifying medical records. Sexual misconduct or unprofessional behavior are other common reasons to lose one’s license. You likely never intended any wrongdoing, or perhaps you were unjustly accused, but this might not make any difference to those in charge. 

The Houston Chronicle explains that nurses who temporarily or permanently lose their licenses still have knowledge, training and skills that can transfer well into other healthcare positions that do not require a professional license. For example, you may look into a position as a home health aide or a medical assistant. On the other hand, you may find it preferable to defend your license, especially if you worry that prospective employers will turn you down for a job. Since this is a complex topic, this information should not replace the advice of a lawyer.